The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports the average earning potential of someone with a bachelor’s degree is $250 per week higher than someone with just a high school diploma.

Stepping from the warzone to the classroom is not always an option for veterans. Some are dealing with injuries from their military service, both visible and invisible wounds.

Answering challenges

Veterans Administration (VA) estimates more than 300,000 veterans are dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) since 2001. PTSD can make social settings like an auditorium classroom seem like a daunting challenge. People suffering from PTSD can be withdrawn and in many cases depressed.

VA established the National Center for PTSD to research and educate on the impact of trauma. The center identifies anxiety, avoiding crowds, and negative feelings as some symptoms of PTSD. That is where online education can help a veteran ease into the college experience, by providing a comfortable setting with more relaxed deadlines.

Handling registration, attending classes, and interaction online can help service members manage the stress as they transition from the military to the civilian world.

Individual solutions

Randy Plunkett, director of education initiatives for Wounded Warrior Project, says online classes can be more convenient. “Maybe the veteran wants to take a medical billing and coding course,” Plunkett offers, “But it is not offered in his city, the online option gives them a chance to take that course, on their own time.”

“Whether it is online, in a college classroom, or even a vocational setting, an education opens doors for a brighter future.”

The college experience may not be for everyone. Online education options can help increase earning potential for all veterans. Plunkett says it is important veterans have many options to further their education.

“Whether it is online, in a college classroom, or even a vocational setting, an education opens doors for a brighter future.”