Women In Tech

Katy Lynch, CEO, Techweek

"'Whatever the problem, be part of the solution. Don’t just sit around raising questions and pointing out obstacles.' This quote speaks to me in both my professional and personal life. Simply put, if there is an issue, fix it. Stop making excuses, and stop allowing other people to make excuses for why problems don't get solved. It's a waste of time and energy." READ MORE

Women In Tech

Britta Wilson, VP of Inclusion Strategies, Expedia

"One of the best pieces of advice I've received is ‘Can't never could and never will.’ More often than not, we limit our actions, dreams and desires to the field of ‘can,’ when in fact, the land of ‘cannot’ is more inspiring. I've embraced it so much that when I'm told what can’t be done, I automatically start considering how it can be done."

Women In Tech

Erin Teague, Director of Product, Yahoo

"Being an introvert, I’ve often found it difficult to assert myself in new environments. This was particularly true in corporate settings. A mentor once shared the importance of speaking up early and often to establish a sense of credibility and presence among my peers. Finding my voice in each subsequent male-dominated room has been key in helping me overcome both intimidation and introversion." READ MORE

Women In Tech

Reshma Saujani, CEO Girls Who Code

"I remember listening to Hillary Clinton speak after the 2008 election and she said something that really resonated with me. She said, "Just because I failed doesn't mean you shouldn't try." I think that's the best piece of career advice anyone could ever receive. I think too often we are so afraid to fail we end up keeping ourselves small. I always say, if you haven't failed yet you haven't tried anything." READ MORE

Women In Tech

Colleen Layman, President, The Society of Women Engineers

"'Be yourself, be authentic and be real.' A woman gave me this piece of advice a long time ago and I’ve tried to stick with it since. I’ve always had the best success when I didn’t try to fit in with the boys. I try to always avoid coloring what I say based on what my male peers might want to hear. When I’m honest and open, I am successful." READ MORE

Women In Tech

Deepa Jain, Software Engineer, Thomson Reuters

"My manager from my first job at Illinois State University, also my mentor and a very good friend, gave me this advice: "Don’t be afraid of change because it is leading you to a new beginning.” This really helped me in keeping my calm and looking at new opportunities that might come with change."

Women In Tech

Kate Fleming, Solutions Engineer, Pointmarc

"Have high standards, and stick to them. This goes for anything in life, but being a woman in tech, you’re automatically subjected to the notion that you’re inferior because of your gender. It’s important to remember to never compromise or negotiate on your principles. Sometimes it’s too easy to turn away in the face of adversity, but remember why you got into this line of work, and stick to what you believe."

Women In Tech

Leslie Ekas, VP of Technology, Global Customer Operations, Expedia

“'Stay true to yourself.' I started in a very male-dominated field—oil and geology—and moved to a technical field that was also male-dominated. I needed a compass. This mantra has been my compass. When I feel any doubt, I go back to what make me tick and that shows me the way.”

Women In Tech

Panna Pavangadkar, R&D Developer Experience, Bloomberg L.P.

"The best piece of advice I got from a woman was at a talk I attended, given by Carla Harris. Her advice was to build my personal board of directors. To find people I could trust to be a sounding board, sometimes to take generic advice, but also specifically to be mentors and sponsors as well." READ MORE

Women In Tech

Emily Atkinson, Developer, MOO

"Try not to mark success by age, compare yourself to others in achievement, or obsess over your own, in that context. Enjoy and ambitiously explore opportunities without that imposition, and stop to appreciate what you've achieved in your own timeline so you can build on your strengths and keep pushing forward."

Women In Tech

Jennifer Petersen, Senior Manager, Group Program, Dice

"My mom always encouraged me to make my voice heard. Early in my career, I worked in an environment where a team member would not acknowledge my presence. My mom reminded me that I have a unique perspective, so I continued to ask questions and give ideas. It took a few years, but he finally saw me as a respected coworker."

Women In Tech

Kelly Schmidt, Sr. Director, Platform Product Management, Getty Images

"Don’t assume you’re wrong because someone disagrees with you. But don’t assume you’re right if someone doesn’t." READ MORE

Women In Tech

Carolyn Leighton, CEO & Founder, Women in Tech International

"Whether you are interviewing with a company or in a meeting with colleagues, focus on how you can contribute to your company's goals, not how the company can contribute to your goals. That alone will set you apart from the vast majority of people." READ MORE